Testing the wings on rare Messerschmitt

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Finally the aircraft was able to try on its wings, after 10 years in the museum restoration workshop. - This is a milestone for the project, says chief of the Royal Norwegian Air Force ANDERS UTGÅRD.

Assembling the wings was a huge step forward for the museums restoration object

Assembling the wings was a huge step forward for the museums restoration object

The aircraft was retrieved from the bottom of the sea outside Rørvik ten years ago and has been through a meticulous restoration process at the workshop since. Thousands of hours has been spent on the iconic and historically significant aircraft since 2009. Today it was finally possible to assemble the largest parts, namely the wings. - The goal today was to try on the wings before the aircraft gets painted, so that we can make adjustments before the grand finale. Luckily it all went great. The guys have done a great and careful job, says Utgård, referring to the volunteers who works at the museum workshop.

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Soon ready for the public

Conservator Michael Loftus carefully adjusting the wing millimeter by millimeter

Conservator Michael Loftus carefully adjusting the wing millimeter by millimeter

The goal is to get the aircraft in to the exhibit during 2020. - We are hoping that we can have it ready in january, but at least next summer, says a determined Utgård. He adds that the aircraft is highly anticipated due to its uniqueness worldwide. - And this specific aircraft also has a very interesting story. We are looking forward to showcasing this in the world war II area, according to Utgård.

During the rescue mission in 2009

During the rescue mission in 2009

Photos from the divers show that the nazi symbols are still visible

Photos from the divers show that the nazi symbols are still visible

The cockpit had gotten new inhabitants

The cockpit had gotten new inhabitants

Tina Andersen